Video: AquaQuad Is The PWC For Fishermen


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Getting personal watercraft enthusiasts interested in fishing from their PWC has been a tough sell (especially for Americans). Although fishing from watercraft has gained attention in sporadic outposts across the country, it hasn’t “set the world on fire” yet, despite huge interest in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. One boat builder has specifically targeted what they (and we) believe is a market “ready to pop” with a specially-designed trimaran-hulled, outboard-driven runabout – the AquaQuad.

Built with fishermen in mind, the AquaQuad’s assembly facilities in the US, and production facilities in Morocco and South Africa look to establish the vehicle as a “global brand.” As per a test session by Boating Magazine, “Despite its 5-foot-4-inch beam and mere 305-pound displacement, the AquaQuad CLX with its design proved so stable that I could stand on the gunwale without it rolling over.”

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As noted in the review, “the name comes from its similarity to land-bound ATVs. Like those, the AquaQuad stays flat or, in a hard turn, leans outboard slightly.” Powered by a 30-horsepower Honda outboard, the AquaQuad reached a top speed of 25.1 mph at 5,900 rpm (at an impressive 8.8 mpg). Boating Magazine also noted, the AquaQuad’s “optimum cruise at 2,000 rpm hit 18 mph, affording a whopping 18.8 mpg.”

Priced at $7,760, the AquaQuad is so lightweight and utilitarian that it can be towed behind A-segment economical coupes and sedans without breaking a sweat. Even when equipped with a fishing seat and forward casting area, tackle and bait station, and deck-mounted rod holders, the AquaQuad still comes in less than a Sea-Doo Spark. And with a trailer costing less than $600, NMMA- and CE-certified AquaQuad might be perfect gateway for fishermen into the PWC world.

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Kevin Shaw

Kevin Shaw

Editor-in-Chief – kevin.shaw@shawgroupmedia.com Kevin Shaw is a decade-long powersports and automotive journalist whose love for things that go too fast has led him to launching The Watercraft Journal. Almost always found with stained hands and dirt under his fingernails, Kevin has an eye for the technical while keeping a eye out for beautiful photography and a great story.

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