Video: Shoreline Yamaha Builds First SHO-Powered Standup


screen-shot-2016-09-09-at-11-32-30-am

“Cacklefest” is a word most jet skiers might not be all too familiar with. In the realm of hot rodding, a cacklefest is the cacophony of open-header dragsters, uncorked hot rods and custom exhaust systems all reverberating simultaneously at a drag race, car show or meet. While the chorus of two-strokes wringing open their throttles at the starting line is something similar, the discombobulating assault on one’s ears just isn’t the same. Well, that is until we heard Shoreline Yamaha’s insane open-manifold Super High Output (SHO) firing off inside the hull of a highly modified custom standup.

Yes, you read that right, a SHO-powered stand-up. The loons at Queensland, Australia’s Shoreline Yamaha working together with the guys out of Racetech Yamaha in New Germany, South Africa, have put together something truly bonkers. The 1,812cc, supercharged Yamaha powerplant appears to be mainly stock, retaining the factory HKS centrifugal supercharger and intercooler arrangement, as well as the cast exhaust manifold. Only modifications to the final exhaust (exiting out of the rear, left gunnel) and air intake (air box) were needed as this machine is shown shredding a nearby lake.

Observant commenters who viewed the video (below) produced by Liquid Cartel noted that the pump clearly doesn’t appear to be able to handle the stupid quantities of thrust that the ski’s new heart and soul is producing, and would likely need some serious prop re-pitching if not a completely new pump altogether. Also pay attention to how the rider continues to blip the throttle like a 2-stroke when clearly, the Yamaha’s throttle control would much rather prefer a smooth, linear acceleration curve. Nevertheless, this thing is a beast and well worth the couple of minutes. Enjoy:

Share this post

Kevin Shaw

Kevin Shaw

Editor-in-Chief – kevin.shaw@shawgroupmedia.com Kevin Shaw is a decade-long powersports and automotive journalist whose love for things that go too fast has led him to launching The Watercraft Journal. Almost always found with stained hands and dirt under his fingernails, Kevin has an eye for the technical while keeping a eye out for beautiful photography and a great story.

No comments

Add yours

No Thanks