Gallery: Sea-Doo Teases “Another Revolution” With Upcoming 2018 Lineup


In one week the world will be introduced to the 2018 Sea-Doo lineup. That might not sound like much to some, but note that 2018 will mark an incredible 50 years of Sea-Doo personal watercraft (with, y’know, a quarter century missing from the middle of that – Sea-Doo returned to PWC in 1988 – but who’s counting?). And 50 years of building some of the world’s most popular PWC is no small feat. The video doesn’t give away much of anything at all, but that’s OK because we already did.

Oh wait. You didn’t know? Yeah well, we did. First, we revealed that Sea-Doo’s ACE 900-powered 2017 GTS/GTI/GTI SE – y’know, the ones with the Polytec hulls – were the best beds for future Recreational segment runabouts, meaning the whole segment is ditching fiberglass for Polytec. The decks will be different too; borrowing the unique CM-Tech deck from the new GTR-X 230, all future GTIs will be a pairing of CM-Tech on top and Polytec on the bottom. Again, read here for the full details.

The other big news that we’re hanging our hat on is the complete retirement of the current RXT/GTX hull, known officially as “S3”. Informed insiders have noted that although the S3-based units (RXT 230, RXT-X 300, GTX S 155, GTX 230, GTX Limited 300) are strong sellers, the hull’s design isn’t as successful in choppier, offshore conditions as say, Kawasaki’s Ultra or Yamaha’s FX platforms. The replacement is expected to lose the strong keel and adopt a deeper-V design all in hopes to make the larger Sea-Doo more rough water-friendly.

There’s one more prediction we have in regards to a new model, but we will make you click here to read about it. But then again, we just might be filling you with false hopes. Who knows? So until September 20th, at 9pm CST (Central Standard Time), we’ll just have to sit and wait.

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Kevin Shaw

Kevin Shaw

Editor-in-Chief – kevin.shaw@shawgroupmedia.com Kevin Shaw is a decade-long powersports and automotive journalist whose love for things that go too fast has led him to launching The Watercraft Journal. Almost always found with stained hands and dirt under his fingernails, Kevin has an eye for the technical while keeping a eye out for beautiful photography and a great story.

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